Caldera Foundation

OVERVIEW: The Caldera Foundation formed when the Ayrshire Foundation split into two separate foundations in July 2015. The Northern California directors adopted this new name and focus grantmaking on environmental issues locally and globally.

FUNDING AREAS: Environment, water and air quality, climate change, renewable energy

IP TAKE: Bay Area groups can get involved with Caldera even though it has a global vision. Send the staff an email with an innovative idea to improve the environment in Northern California.

PROFILE: Established in July 2015, the Caldera Foundation formed when the Ayrshire Foundation split into two separate foundations. The directors working on grantmaking in the Los Angeles area and in Michigan kept the Ayrshire name, while the Northern California directors adopted this new name. Prior to July 2015, Ayrshire supported the following causes: youth, the elderly and disabled, science and the environment, health care, and community culture. Back then, Ayrshire focused on three geographic locations for these topics, including the Bay Area. The foundation’s current areas of interest include all environmental topics, such as water and air quality, climate change, and renewable energy.

The Caldera Foundation is more interested in spreading good ideas, building connections, and pursuing practical solutions in a broader sense. It provides seed funding at early pivotal stages and attracts funding from large social investors. Air-related grants have gone to Golden Gate National Parks and the Union of Concerned Scientists. Earth-related grants have gone to the Pacific Forest Trust and the California Climate and Agriculture Network of CalCAN. Water-related grants have gone to the Pacific Institute and the California Academy of Sciences. Finally, energy-related grants have gone to Slide Ranch and the Rocky Mountain Institute.

Caldera Foundation grants tend to range from $25,000 to $200,000. View lists of past grantees by funding category on the foundation’s website. Many of the foundation’s grants stay in Northern California and in the Western Pacific region. Yet it is clear that Caldera is taking a more global approach, even in its local giving, than it did while part of the Ayrshire Foundation. Its broader geographic scope is shown in its funding for groups working on environmental issues in Israel and Palestine, for example.

Under its current structure, Caldera does not accept unsolicited grant proposals from nonprofits. However, it does welcome the opportunity to learn about relevant initiatives. The best way to get in touch is by emailing the foundation at info@calderafoundation.org or filling out its online contact form.

PEOPLE:

  • Search for staff contact info and bios in PeopleFinder (paid subscribers only.)

LINKS: