Abel and Judy Friedman Charitable Foundation

OVERVIEW: Batory Foods founder Abel Friedman and his wife, Judy, move their philanthropy through the Abel and Judy Friedman Charitable Foundation. The foundation's Chicago grantmaking includes support of community organizations, education, health, and human services. 

FUNDING AREAS: Jewish causes, community and civic organizations, education, health, human services

IP TAKE: The foundation keeps a low-profile and does not appear to accept unsolicited proposals. The family is especially interested in Jewish causes, so nonprofits working in this area might have an advantage.

PROFILE: In 1979, Abel Friedman founded Chicago Sweeteners, now Batory Foods, a food and beverage distributor. Friedman and his wife Judy engage in philanthropy via the Abel and Judy Friedman Charitable Foundation. This is a low-profile vehicle with a minimal web presence. The couple's giving through their foundation prioritizes Chicagoland, with a particular interest in community organizations, education, and health and human services. A number of these organizations are within the Jewish community.

The Friedmans are strongly involved with the Moishe House Chicago, which " builds a diverse, progressive, and inclusive community in an egalitarian Jewish context that is committed to working towards a more just society." Other community organizations that the couple has supported include The Jewish Women's Foundation of Metropolitan Chicago, Illinois Holocaust Museum, and Jewish United Fund of Metropolitan Chicago.

The couple also supports education in Chicagoland. Grantees have included Louis and Saerree Fiedler Hillel at Northwestern University, and Chicagoland Jewish High School. The foundation's grantmaking also involves support of miscellaneous charities that are undisclosed in recent tax records. The family's support of health and human services in Chicago, meanwhile, includes earmarking funds for outfits like Children's Hospital of Chicago, Children's Oncology Services, and American Heart Services. 

Foundation grants tend to be between $5,000 and $25,000. Grantseekers can view lists of past grantees in the funder’s recent tax records. Foundation grantmaking is not restricted to only Chicago, but this is where the bulk of giving takes place. In a recent year, the bulk of the foundation's funds went to education and community organizations.

It does not appear that this foundation accepts unsolicited grant applications. The foundation is based in suburban Skokie, Illinois, and its phone number is 847-677-7806.

PEOPLE:

  • Search for staff contact info and bios in PeopleFinder (paid subscribers only.)