Dr. Miriam and Sheldon G. Adelson Medical Research Foundation: Grants for Disease

OVERVIEW: The Adelson Medical Research Foundation names neurology, oncology, and immunology as its priority funding areas

IP TAKE: Cross-disciplinary collaboration and sharing is of the utmost importance at Adelson. Grantseekers with an unwillingness to collaborate with other scientists or a penchant for operating in a medical research silo will only result in this funder passing them over.

PROFILE: The Dr. Miriam and Sheldon G. Adelson Medical Research Foundation (AMRF) was established in 2006 in an effort to understand how and why medical discovery moved at such a slow pace. The foundation works to break down medical research barriers that lead to scientific investigator isolation by supporting efforts in collaborative research.

AMRF awards grants in the disciplines of neurology, oncology, and immunology out of the following programs:

Core Cancer. Focusing on broad spectrum of cancers, this program zeroes in on the “identification and validation of novel cancer therapeutic targets and the subsequent clinical testing of agents that interfere with their function.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease. This program awards grants toward the development of innovative strategies “for target discovery in IBD.”

Melanoma. AMRF concentrates its funding on identifying the characteristics of the most malignant melanoma subtypes.

Neural Repair and Rehabilitation. This program is devoted to research into the repair and rehabilitation of damage to the brain, spinal cord or nerves.

Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway. The foundation supports “cellular processes will lead to new therapies for malignancies, immunological and inflammatory diseases, degenerative diseases of the nervous system, neural regeneration and long-term memory and learning.

Throughout all of its grantmaking programs, AMRF seeks to foster connections and develop collaborations across research disciplines, as well as within them. According to the foundation, this approach helps investigators find “common denominators across diseases in their genes, cells, molecules and pathways,” which AMRF hopes will quicken the pace of medical discovery.

AMRF accepts unsolicited inquiries from scientists and researchers who are interested in joining the AMRF program as collaborating scientists. Funding ranges from around $250,000 to upwards of $1 million.

PEOPLE:

  • Steve Garfinkel, Vice President
  • Marissa White, Head of Funding and Contracts Administration

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