Legacy Alcoa Foundation: Grants for Global Development

OVERVIEW: The Legacy Alcoa Foundation’s global development grants typically support organizations that work on climate change and biodiversity.

IP TAKE: The Alcoa foundation requires its grantees to request a minimum Alcoa investment of $15,000. Also, the foundation prefers goals that can be measured, so grantseekers' proposals should be data-centric.

PROFILE: Alcoa is one of the world's leading aluminum companies and its charitable arm, the Legacy Alcoa Foundation (formerly the Alcoa Foundation since 1952) advances its environmental goals. With the Alcoa Inc. separation complete, the assets of the former Alcoa Foundation were divided into two separate, non-profit foundations, Arconic Foundation, which works to prepare "tomorrow's workforce for successful careers [...] that advance the future of manufacutring" through STEM education, and the Legacy Alcoa Foundation, which supports "research programs and initiatives that preserve biodiversity, particularly as it relates to mining and refining activities, and in programs and research aimed at mitigating climate change.” One of the few endowed corporate foundations around, Legacy Alcoa invests were its corporation operations.

Legacy Alcoa's investments support programs dedicated to climate change, biodiversity, and the sustainability. It features two forms of grantmaking: Location grants and Signature grants. The foundation's staff works closely with designated points of contact at each Alcoa location to create a local grantmaking strategy based on its key focus areas, or "location grants." In contrast, "signature" grants help to develop global partnerships and programs that support climate change and biodiversity issues. 

Organizations operating in the over 30 countries where Alcoa has business interests are eligible to apply for a grant. For more information on how the foundation invests its money, read its latest Investment Portfolio

Groups interested in obtaining Alcoa Foundation support will have introduce themselves to Alcoa's company office nearest the location of a proposed project. Alcoa's grantmaking focuses on measured results, so grantseekers should include supporting statistics and measurable goals in their proposals.

PEOPLE:

  • Esra Ozer, President, Alcoa Foundation
  • William Oplinger, Director
  • Roy Harvey, Director
  • Jack Bergen Director
  • Alan Cransberg, Director