Osprey Foundation: Grants for Global Development

OVERVIEW: The Osprey Foundation addresses a number of global development challenges including water and sanitation, gender equality and food security. 

IP TAKE: The Osprey Foundation tends to build lasting, long-term relationships with its grantees, restricting the funding opportunities for newcomers; however, several grassroots organizations enjoy multi-year support from Osprey and make it onto Osprey's grantee list. 

PROFILE: Founded in 2003 with wealth accumulated from a successful career in finance, Bill Clarke now dedicates himself full-time to the Osprey Foundation. His years spent working in the Mayan communities of the Guatemalan highlands inspired his current focus areas on WASH and cookstoves in the developing world. The foundation strives to "empower individuals and communities through education, health, economic opportunity and human rights in a sustainable way." It envisions a world of equality, tolerance and equanimity. 

Osprey does not have a specific global development grantmaking program. However, related grants are awarded through the foundation's four main areas of focus:

  • Health and Wellness. Areas of interest include clean cookstoves, sustainable community development, family wellness, and education.
  • Social Empowerment. Osprey looks to foster change in gender equality, women’s empowerment, human rights, access to housing, education and food security.
  • Ecological. Topics of focus include energy poverty, local business development, preserving ecosytems, and national policy advocacy for green technologies.
  • Ecumenical and Interfaith. Osprey supports projects to promote peace, economic justice and gender equality.  

Osprey restricts its grantmaking to Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, and its hometown of Baltimore, Maryland. For a more concrete idea of the types of organization’s Osprey funds, examine its Current Grantee list.

This is a small family run foundation with no paid staff, and it does not award many international grants annually. The majority of Osprey’s grants range from $25,000 to $100,000, but it does award a few large grants between $300,000 and $600,000 to large international NGOs. Its grants can fund operating support, may be multi-year, and the foundation seeks an innovative approach to each project on which it works.

Osprey actively seeks out new grantees and does not accept or review unsolicited proposals at this time. 

PEOPLE:

  • William C. Clarke, President
  • Steven Clarke, Director
  • Jesse Clarke, Director
  • Lindsay Wells, Director

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