Violet Jabara Charitable Trust: Grants for Global Development

OVERVIEW: The Violet Jabara Charitable Trust supports innovative programs in economic development, reproductive health, women’s welfare, environment, peacebuilding, microfinance, social entrepreneurship, and education in specific countries in the Middle East.

IP TAKE: This is an approachable funder that seeks groups that apply nontraditional tactics to deeply embedded global development challenges in the Middle East. Funding priority is given to small organizations.

PROFILE: Throughout the better part of her career, Dr. Linda Jacobs has been involved in a variety of programs and initiatives related to the Middle East. In 2007, she established the Violet Jabara Charitable Trust to honor her mother. The trust is dedicated to improving “the lives of the people in developing countries of the Middle East and to foster greater understanding of Middle Eastern culture in the United States.”

VJC funds innovative programs in economic development, reproductive health and women’s welfare. Its economic development interests are broad: health, environment, peacebuilding, microfinance, social entrepreneurship, and education. However, it does not limit its funding to those specific fields. Grantseekers whose work does not fall neatly within these categories are encouraged to contact the trust provided their projects support the VJC's mission on behalf of people in the Middle East, and toward greater understanding between cultures and countries.

Because it is a relatively small organization, the trust awards less than 10 grants a year. Grant amounts vary widely and range from $1,000 to $50,000. To learn more about the types of organizations the trust supports, visit its Recent Grants page. 

The trust prioritizes organizations working in Lebanon, Jordan, Syria, Iraq, Iran, Palestine, Yemen, Egypt and North Africa. 

This is an approachable funder that accepts unsolicited letters of inquiry on a rolling basis. The trust is not opposed to offering general operating support, which can be difficult to come across. It also gives program-specific grants. While it prefers funding smaller global development organizations, it also seeks groups with the capacity to scale sometime in the near future.

PEOPLE: 

  • Steven Wohl, Trustee 

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