Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation: Grants for Higher Education

OVERVIEW: The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial broadly funds “programs of national scope” related to law, human rights, environment, public health, education, arts, and culture.

IP TAKE: This funder does not award a large number of higher education grants each year.

PROFILE: Catherine Hughes Waddell and Chauncey Waddell created the Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation, but it was not until Catherine’s “untimely death in 1961” when Chauncey Waddell established the foundation to honor Catherine’s father, who served as a former Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court. The foundation’s grantmaking priorities include education, legal and human rights, population and health, and arts and culture.

The foundation's higher education grantmaking supports organizations that ensure the “provision of a sound education that enables all Americans to Lead productive lives and participate as active citizens.” This support includes in-school and out-of-school programs for K-12 students, as well as colleges and universities. The foundation's past higher education grantees include Cornell University, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, and Princeton University.

Higher education institutions may also seek funding in the field of Legal and Human Rights, which “supports programs aimed at assuring fundamental constitutional and human rights, particularly for those who traditionally have been disenfranchised,” as well as “programs targeted at assuring that citizens may exercise those rights, including, for example, assistance for those unable to afford counsel” and “legal education, especially in public interest law.”

Grants typically range from $2,000 to $50,000. Higher education institutions may also seek funding in the field of Legal and Human Rights, which “supports programs aimed at assuring fundamental constitutional and human rights, particularly for those who traditionally have been disenfranchised,” as well as “programs targeted at assuring that citizens may exercise those rights, including, for example, assistance for those unable to afford counsel” and “legal education, especially in public interest law.” Previous recipients include the Brennan Center for Justice at the NYU School of Law.

Hughes announces its Past Grantees, but does not publicize its grant values. The foundation does not accept any unsolicited proposals or letters of inquiry.

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