Lorie Slutsky, The New York Community Trust

TITLE: President

FUNDING AREAS: Children, youth, and families; community development and the environment; education, arts, and human justice; and health and people with special needs

CONTACT: Visit PeopleFinder for email and phone number (paid subscribers only)

IP TAKE: Back in 1991, Slutsky was named one of "40 Under 40 To Watch." She's grown up now, but, at the helm of one of the biggest givers in NYC, she unquestionably still is watched.

PROFILE: Lorie Slutsky has been president of the New York Community Trust (NYCT) since way back in 1990 after beginning her career there 13 years earlier, in 1977. Back then, she was a grantmaker with responsibility for education, housing, government and urban affairs, and neighborhood revitalization. She was then executive vice president for three years before ascending to her current position.

Here's her full bio on NYCT's own website:

"Lorie has been the president of The Trust since 1990. She began her career at The Trust in 1977 as a grantmaker with responsibility for education, housing, government and urban affairs, and neighborhood revitalization. She was named executive vice president in 1987, when she assumed responsibility for strategic planning, personnel and budget management, and oversight of all departments.

Lorie received her B.A. from Colgate University, where she served for nine years as a trustee and chairman of the budget committee, and her M.A. from The New School, where she also was as a trustee. She sits on the Chief Judge’s Task Force To Expand Access to Civil Legal Services in New York State and chairs its RFP Work Group. She is a member of the board of Independent Sector and co-chairs its Panel on the Nonprofit Sector.

Lorie is a former board chairman of the Council on Foundations and BoardSource, and vice chairman of The Foundation Center. She also is a director of two for-profit companies: Alliance Bernstein Capital Management and AXA Financial."

Despite the name, NYCT does not confine its grantmaking activities to New York. While it certainly does  concentrate on New York's five boroughs, it also wades into the greater New York Metro Area (Westchester County and New Jersey, for instance)—it supports programs in all of its granting arenas from Maine to California.