Lynn Mosier, Donald W. Reynolds Foundation

TITLE: Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

FUNDING AREAS: Journalism schools, chairs in journalism

CONTACT: lynn.mosier@dwrf.org, (702) 804-6000

IP TAKE: Mosier is ex-general manager of The Las Vegas Review who left for this high profile position where she plays a key role in much of their financial matters.

PROFILE: Executive vice president and chief financial officer Lynn Mosier is one of the most highly ranked officers at the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation. She "handle[s] the foundation's administrative functions including accounting and tax, budgets, investment, payroll, human resources, information technology, facilities management and grant administration, tracking and compliance." She's also a trustee at the foundation and an ex-general manager of The Las Vegas Review, a nice background for someone at a foundation that donates piles of money to journalism schools. In short, Mosier makes a very good friend for a development officer at a journalism school to have. 

The Sequoya County Times places Mosier as a "native of Muldrow [Oklahoma, and]... a certified public accountant." She received her "bachelor of science degree in accounting from Northeastern State University in Tahlequah." Mosier first joined the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation in 1999 as a VP of finance and administration.

The Donald W. Reynolds Foundation first tested the grant making water in journalism during the 1980's. Then, in 1992, it gave $2.5 million to University of Reno, resulting in the namesake Donald W. Reynolds School of Journalism and Center for Advanced Media Studies. It renewed support for the school with $1 million in 2007 and another $8 million in 2009. The foundation also earmarked $24.1 million to the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism from 2004 through 2013.  

Mosier personally invested enough trust in the school to put her own son through it. He graduated from there in 2009. The foundation's history with University of Reno perhaps exemplifies the foundation's funding pattern in this area quite well. They've since set up similar philanthropic franchises at Arizona State University, University of Columbia, and Virginia's Washington and Lee University. From the information available, it seems as though Reynolds donates to a small group of schools, but remains loyal to them over the course of many decades. After initial grants, they come through again and again with renovation and upkeep funding as well as new academic endowments of various sorts.

Another chair in business journalism at Oklahoma University was endowed by the foundation recently, and represents their commitment in the area. It signals that Reynolds still seeks to expand its sphere of influence in the nation's journalism schools. The above linked article also includes a reference to the “foundation's five-year plan to establish greater opportunities for business-specific journalistic research and reporting in schools across the country."

The foundation unfortunately espouses a "don't-call-us-we'll-call-you" philosophy of grant making in terms of university development and other areas. The general thrust of their effort in journalism funding is to help train communications professionals who plan to go into either business journalism, or to focus specifically on covering beats in sparsely populated communities. They also seem mostly interested in schools located in the Midwestern region of the country.