Joan Weinstein, Getty Foundation

TITLE: Deputy Director

FUNDING AREAS: Access to art collections, art history, conservation

CONTACT: Visit PeopleFinder for email and phone number (paid subscribers only)

PROFILE: Dr. Joan Weinstein first joined the Getty in the early 1990s, for what she thought would be merely a temporary position. She remains there to this day, now as Deputy Director of the Getty Foundation. Though she first made her mark as an art historian of early 20th century German art, Weinstein has grown into a champion of post-war Los Angeles art movements, such as Chicano murals and skate culture. When she speaks, her even tones belie an enthusiasm for the arts that's as strong as any young idealist, and a deep pride in the Getty Foundation's accomplishments.

As a young art history scholar, Weinstein studied at UCLA and became an Assistant Professor of Fine Arts at the University of Pittsburgh. Her focus was early 20th century German art, and an Edward Dickson Travel Fellowship enabled her to dig into German archives firsthand. In 1990, the University of Chicago Press published her groundbreaking book, The End of Expressionism: Art and the November Revolution in Germany, 1918-19. Her perspective on modern German art was a break from conventional interpretations, and her work remains formative for a new generation of art historians.

Weinstein joined the Getty as a Senior Program Officer of the Getty Grant Program before it morphed into the Getty Foundation. Back then she helped to award collaborative research grants, post-doctoral fellowships, and curatorial research fellowships to artists and scholars at home and abroad. Her position has changed several times since, from Associate Director, to Interim Director (at the time colleague Deborah Marrow was filling in as Interim President and CEO), to Deputy Director. Whatever the title, she has remained part of the close core of Getty leaders and officers of the Getty Foundation, Getty Research Institute, Conservation Center, Museum, and Trust.

In 1993, she helped found the Getty's Multicultural Undergraduate Internship program, which funds paid summer positions for diverse students at Los Angeles museums and arts organizations. In 2006, she supported Rescue Public Murals, a Heritage Preservation initiative to document and preserve public murals throughout the US. "Public murals are vital community assets," said Weinstein, "and a national strategy to document and preserve them will benefit artists, scholars, and the broader public." She was also behind the 2008 decision to pledge continued funding to museums and preservation efforts in sub-Saharan Africa. This included support to PREMA, a training program for African conservators that aimed to "train the trainers…to find solutions" in their home countries.

In recent years, Weinstein has been busy co-directing Pacific Standard Time, a multi-year collaboration of more than 60 cultural institutions throughout southern California. Through PST, Weinstein, along with Deborah Barrow, supported investigations into "the films of the African American L.A. Rebellion to the feminist happenings of the Woman's Building; from ceramics to Chicano performance art; and from Japanese-American design to the pioneering work of artists' collectives." Their goal was to capture the post-war art history of Los Angeles before its cultural significance could be lost.

At the Getty, she helps guide and define the foundation's directive to advance "the understanding and preservation of the visual arts locally and throughout the world." She upholds this vision across the four funding priorities of art history, conservation, collections, and professional development. Her track record shows that the projects Weinstein consistently throws her weight behind are multicultural, embody history, and engage a community. Here is a video profile of Weinstein the arts administrator, and the person.

Antoine Wilmering, Getty Foundation

TITLE: Senior Program Officer

FUNDING AREAS: Access to art collections, art history, art conservation

CONTACT: Visit PeopleFinder for email and phone number (paid subscribers only)

PROFILE: Antoine M.Wilmeringcomes from an esteemed old breed of arts conservators—the kind who honed their skills in years of meticulous studio practice. It seems he is too busy rolling up his sleeves, going on site visits, and lovingly restoring overlooked cultural artifacts to be seen giving too many presentations or speaking to the press.

Wilmering perfected his craft at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where he spent 12 years in Objects Conservation. He is an expert—perhaps the expert—on furniture and wooden objects conservation, serving as an educator and consulting in this arena for institutions worldwide. His post as Senior Program Officer at the Getty Foundation allows him to pioneer special international conservation efforts like MOSAIKON and the Panel Paintings Initiative.

While at the Met, Wilmering led the team that reinstalled the Gubbio studiolo. That mouthful was the private 15th century study of Federico da Montefeltro, and is now a famous work of Italian Renaissance art. The walls of the study are elaborate intarsia panels—an intricate wood inlay technique that is right up Wilmering's alley. The history, materials, and techniques of intarsia represent just one corner of his vast knowledge and fine woodworking and restoration skills. Multiple publications from this and other Met conservation projects bear witness to his experience.

Wilmering came to the Getty after a four-year stint teaching at Tainan National University of the Arts in Taiwan. While there he studied the long-term effects of airborne fungi on museum objects in galleries and display windows in southern Taiwan. He joined both the Getty Trust and the Getty Foundation as a Program Officer in 2004. In his Los Angeles post, he continues to focus on objects conservation—a passion that apparently won't be squelched.

One of his passion projects at the Getty is MOSAIKON, a consortium of centers and committees working "to develop innovative models for mosaics preservation around the Mediterranean." Its central goal is to train and equip local technicians to properly care for mosaics using sustainable materials. Wilmering is also at the helm of the Panel Paintings Initiative, which unites the Getty Foundation, Museum, and Conservation Institute to train conservators to restore and stabilize historic multi-panel pieces like the Ghent Altarpiece. Wilmering says it is an attempt to "[revive] the old workshop model… in which a master passes on his or her expertise to apprentices." He speaks about the Panel Paintings Initiative in-depth in this video press statement.

The Getty Foundation's previous conservation initiatives have focused on architectural conservation and treatment or restoration of monuments. Philadelphia's Fairmount Park Association received funding to reinstall and care for the renowned Louise Nevelson sculpture, Atmosphere and Environment XII. Swiss architect Le Corbusier's La Maison Blanche was restored through a Getty grant, as was a 16th century Rajput-Mughal palace complex in Jodhpur, India. The Getty Foundation also completed a three-year cycle of grants to preserve L.A.'s own historic and cultural sites.

Currently, grantmaking in the area of conservation prioritizes projects that "promote the interdisciplinary practice of conservation… and foster collaboration between conservators, art historians, conservations scientists, and other heritage professionals." They are looking to train and support a new generation of conservators that are at least as skilled as Wilmering. Since 2009, all conservation grants have fallen under the MOSAIKON or Panel Paintings Initiative umbrellas, and were primarily awarded to European institutions. Historically, the focus of grantmaking has been much broader, and the Getty will surely shift initiatives in due time. 

Deborah Marrow, Getty Foundation

TITLE: Director

FUNDING AREAS: Access to collections, art history, and conservation

CONTACT: Visit PeopleFinder for email and phone number (paid subscribers only)

PROFILE: Deborah Marrow serves as director of the Getty Foundation, the arts grants wing of the palatial J. Paul Getty Trust. She's kept a rock-solid grip on that position since 1989. There are few arts administrators as broadly connected, widely revered, and unquestionably powerful as Marrow.

"No one is trained to be a grant maker," said Marrow in 1990. "Everyone falls into the field from somewhere else. I fell into it from art history." Marrow was quite a successful art historian, specializing in 17th century French and Italian art and writing a book on Florentine arts patron Maria de Medici, the woman who effectively made grants to Peter Paul Rubens. Now Marrow is emulating her subject — only she fosters other historians. Her first years as a grantmaker were focused on projects such as the study of Japanese hand scrolls and the repair of crumbling murals in Mexico City.

Marrow has been with the Getty since 1983, when she joined the foundation to launch a publications program that underwrote and published scholarly works on art history. Throughout the years, she has stepped in as interim director of the Getty Research Institute and interim president and CEO of the Trust. During her tenure, she has since overseen the distribution of some $300 million in arts grants to institutions worldwide.

Friends and colleagues of Marrow's describe her as sincere and a natural networker who loves meeting people from all walks of life. She doesn't hide out in her office hunched over a desk—she leads by walking the building, visiting with her colleagues, and starting conversations. She values relationships, collaboration, and democratic competition. At the Getty, she's responsible for transforming its fellowship program from insular and elitist to open, competitive, and panel judged.

Marrow is both L.A.-centric and globally minded. The contradiction makes sense when you consider that Los Angeles itself is a sprawling Petri dish of cultural encounter and globalization. When the Berlin Wall came down, Marrow responded with the Central and Eastern European Initiative, a fund for the region's libraries and scholars. When Hurricane Katrina broke loose, she created the Fund for New Orleans to rebuild damaged collections and historic sites. An ongoing program, Connecting Art Histories, aims to draw art historians in impoverished or oppressive countries into conversation and collaboration with other scholars.

Of all her grantmaking overtures, Marrow's magnum opus is Pacific Standard Time: Art in LA, 1945-1980. She spent a decade seeking to "[rescue] the endangered history of art in Los Angeles in the postwar decades, and [share] its stories with the public." She distributed millions of dollars to museums and centers to create books, archives, and permanent collections. Her labors came to fruition in 2012, with a six-month long festival of exhibitions, shows, performance, lectures, public art, and more. Hundreds of sites and millions of visitors participated in her vision. In a statement released in January 2013, Marrow indicated that the momentum of Pacific Standard Time and the model of "large regional collaboration" will continue to inform the Getty Foundation's interests, activities, and grants.

A Los Angeles Times staff writer described Marrow as "an arts administrator who knows how to keep her balance and sense of clarity." This was exactly what the Getty needed when, in 2006, then president Barry Munitz resigned over allegations that the museum was holding looted antiquities. That was Marrow's first foray as interim Getty president (her second would come in 2010), and both times all of Los Angeles breathed a sigh of relief when she took the helm.

Believe it or not, Marrow did have a life before the Getty—she has lived multiple lives, in fact. She is an art historian hailing from the University of Pennsylvania, where she earned her undergrad degree and completed her PhD, punctuated by a master's from Johns Hopkins. She worked at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, taught art history here and there, and continues to serve as trustee of UPenn and a board member of Town Hall Los Angeles. In one incarnation she was on the National Trust for Historic Preservation committee of the White House Millennium Council. Even harder to believe is that, on top of it all, Marrow has remained happily married for 41 years and raised three children.

At the Getty Foundation, Marrow and five other senior staff steer Getty Trust funds toward individuals and institutions that "strengthen art history as a global discipline, promote the interdisciplinary practice of conservation, increase access to museum and archival collections, and develop current and future leaders in the visual arts."

Take a look at this clip to hear Deborah Marrow describe some of the Getty Foundation's funding priorities, and online arts journalism, in her own words.

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Thomas Gaehtgens, The J. Paul Getty Trust

TITLE: Director, Getty Research Institute

FUNDING AREAS: Fine arts, visual arts, and art history

CONTACT: Visit PeopleFinder for email and phone number (paid subscribers only)

PROFILE: Thomas Gaehtgens serves as director of the Getty Research Institute, which included the following bio in its announcement of Gaehtgens's upcoming 2018 retirement:

Thomas W. Gaehtgens received his doctorate in 1966 at the Institute of Art History at the Universität Bonn and his habilitation in 1972 at the Universität Göttingen. In 1979, he was a Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. Between 1980 and 2006 he served as professor at the Freie Universität in Berlin. He was a Getty Scholar at the J. Paul Getty Center for the History of Art and the Humanities, Santa Monica, from 1985 to 1986. In 1992, he organized the 26th International Congress of Art History in Berlin and served as the president of the Comité International d’Histoire de l’Art (CIHA) from 1992 to 1996. Professor Gaehtgens taught at the Collège de France in 1995 and held the position of European Chair at the Collège de France between 1998 and 1999. He was director of the Deutsches Forum für Kunstgeschichte/Centre allemand d’histoire de l’art in Paris, an organization he founded in 1997. In 2004, he received an honorary doctorate at the Courtauld Institute of Art. Since 2007, he has been the director of the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles. Professor Gaehtgens was awarded the Grand Prix de l'Académie Française pour la Francophonie in 2009. In 2011, he received an honorary doctorate from the Paris-Sorbonne, and was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In recognition of his influential scholarship, Gaehtgens was awarded the prestigious Prix Mondial Cino del Duca 2015 by the Institut de France. His research interests include eighteenth- to twentieth-century French and German art history, as well as the history of the museum.

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