One Detroit Funder’s Plan for a Biotech Boost in the Struggling City

Detroit has become a symbol of urban decline in the rust belt. But the foundation named after the former owner of the Detroit Pistons just made a suite of grants to make Southeast Michigan a symbol of biotechnology and health care innovation. The grants aim to translate the region’s educational and research assets into business opportunities. 

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Howard Hughes Medical Institute Launches Nearly $90 Million in STEM Grants

In its latest move to improve science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education in the United States, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute has put nearly $90 million up for grabs for colleges and universities interested in laying the groundwork for the next generation — and the generation after that — of scientists.

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What if Science was Fun? Noyce Foundation Sends Science Educators Back to School

Chris Siefert has long been the force behind community development projects in Pittsburgh. From his post at the Children's Museum of Pittsburgh, he has commissioned sculptures for local parks and started a campaign to brighten up his city's north side. Now, with the support of the Noyce Foundation, he's jumping on a new initiative that will help him add a hands-on science education program to the arts- and culture-focused offerings at his workplace.

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Who Are the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's of All-Star Profs?

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute is looking for a few good mentors. The institute, which has claimed the mantle of the United States' most generous private funder of science education programs, is on the hunt for its latest crop of HHMI Professors. Launched in 2002, the program is aimed at encouraging scientists to integrate education in their work.

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How the Amgen Foundation Seeks Cure for Science Education Woes

The foundation for Jody Hartigan’s career as a science teacher at St. Patrick Catholic School in Louisville, Kentucky, was laid at an early age. She fell in love with the profession as a kindergartner, and today she has earned a reputation as a passionate educator who loves watching kids mature in the classroom.

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How the Research Corporation for Science Advancement Puts the Science Back in Science Education

When the Research Corporation for Science Advancement decided in 1994 to launch its Cottrell Scholar Awards program, the goal was to unite the research and teaching functions that had grown so disconnected at Ph.D.-granting institutions. The program has now taken on a life of its own.

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Can the W.M. Keck Foundation Level the Playing Field for STEM Education?

The Keck Foundation awarded a $200,000 grant to support the Summer Math and Science Honors program, otherwise known as SMASH. The program searches for high-achieving students from low-income households in the Los Angeles area. These kids join the program for three years, spending five weeks each summer studying a STEM subject in a college setting while living in dorms at UCLA or the University of Southern California.

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Yes, Bill Gates Still Cares About Computer Science

It can be easy these days to imagine that Bill Gates is no longer much of a computer buff. After all, the guy is busy saving the world from any number of dreaded diseases like malaria and polo. Also, Gates has been out of Microsoft for years.

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A Tesla Museum? If a Comic Creator Has His Way

This remarkable character was recently rediscovered and became a favorite topic of a web comic, The Oatmeal. The creator of The Oatmeal, Matt Inman, discovered that the site of one of Tesla's old laboratories was for sale and proposed the idea of buying the site and building a museum. (The idea is explained here.)

While the Seattle-based Inman is not your usual wealthy philanthropist, The Oatmeal has been hugely successful, with 2012 revenues of $500,000. And that doesn't include Inman's book deal. 

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Check Out These Howard Hughes Medical Institute Research Scholars

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) announced their list of 13 Senior International Research Scholar (SIRS) award recipients who will receive a total of $6.5 million to continue their work based on their previous contributions to "research in the biological sciences." The first round of SIRS awards come from countries ranging from Canada to South Africa, and they study immune response, parasitic diseases, and a slew of various sub-fields in genetics.

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How Stumbling Freshmen Get Help at Highland University

Freshmen at New Mexico's Highland University will benefit from $500,000 worth of help with their science homework from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation for the university's Achieving in Research, Math and Science Program (ARMAS). ARMAS is an early warning system for catching students who have a hard time with science before they have a chance to get discouraged and demotivated.
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What You Should Know about Alcoa Foundation's OPTIONS

The Alcoa Foundation granted $30,000 to a summer program called OPTIONS, designed to expose kids in grades 8 through 12 the vocational possibilities in the fields of engineering and computer science. The money will subsidize scholarships for these middle and high school students who finish the OPTIONS program and go on to attend The University of Evansville.

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What Will Millsaps' New Science Curriculum Look Like?

It's about time someone re-evaluated how much students actually learn by dropping expensive laboratory glassware on the floor and cutting frogs open. The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) gave $1.4 million to Mississippi's Millsaps College this week to overhaul their science curriculum, according to New-medical.net. The new program will attempt to get more kids interested in pre-medical education and other types of scientific training.

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