Marcus Foundation: Grants for Diseases

OVERVIEW: The Marcus Foundation’s disease related grantmaking is relatively wide ranging. The foundation has a history of supporting research related to cancer, innovative therapies to treat conditions such as heart disease and autism, pathology, ALS, and conditions affecting the brain.

IP TAKE: Marcus’ disease related funding is largely focused on research rather than direct care. This is an extremely quiet funder with next to no web presence, making it difficult for lesser-known disease research outfits to get the foundation’s attentions--not to mention that the vast majority of its related grants are awarded to large, well-known medical institutions and research facilities.

PROFILE: According to Bernard “Bernie” Marcus’ profile on Forbes, the Home Depot cofounder has already given away over $1 billion through his Atlanta-based Marcus Foundation. But you would hardly know it, as the foundation keeps a pretty low profile and doesn’t have a website.

While the foundation’s grantmaking isn’t nearly as headline-grabbing or splashy as that of Bernie Marcus’ personal philanthropy, it awards hundreds of grants each year, many surpassing the million dollar mark. Main areas of giving focus for the Marcus Foundation include education, health and Jewish causes.

The foundation's support for disease-related causes spans a decent number of conditions and illnesses, including different types of cancers, innovative therapies to treat conditions such as heart disease and autism, pathology, ALS, and conditions affecting the brain.

Since the foundation does not have a website, it’s nearly impossible to determine its overall mission or grantmaking goals. However, it does look like the organization has an affinity for innovative and novel projects and programs.

Grant amounts run the gamut here, from around $10,000 to over $1 million, though most fall between $25,000 and $200,000. The majority of grants are awarded to large medical institutions and research facilities. However, some grants also go to groups fighting certain diseases, such as the Israel Cancer Association and the National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association.

Given its penchant for flying under the radar, it comes as no surprise that the Marcus Foundation does not accept unsolicited proposals.

PEOPLE: 

  • Jay Kaiman, Executive Director

CONTACT:

1266 W. Paces Ferry Road No. 615
Atlanta, Georgia 30327
(404) 240-7700